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Childhood obesity

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This paper is about Childhood Obesity It discusses the multiple factors associated with obesity ...... More...
4 Pages / 900 Words
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Paper Abstract:
This paper is about Childhood Obesity. It discusses the multiple factors associated with obesity in American children such as environmental, parental and genetics influence the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity. It discusses factors from the point of view of a professional psychologist.

Paper Introduction:
There is a significant increase in the incidence of obesity in the Americanpopulation according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Alarmingly this problem affects more children each day There are manyreasons for this Among them are diets high in fat sugar and caloriescombined with a sedentary lifestyle among many Americans includingchildren Marianne Hurst writing for Education Week suggests thatmany overweight children may have eating disorders This may be the reasonof their abnormal weight gain One of these eating disorders is

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Institute of Medicine plan takes on childhood obesity. There are manyreasons for this. It requires fundamental changes in American society to reversethe trend in childhood obesity. Nutrition Research Newsletter, 23(7): 5.Willms, D. This research suggests aninteraction between a child's genetic disposition to obesity and his or herenvironment during their mother's pregnancy and the first year of life. Many parents are not aware of the potential health hazards associatedwith childhood obesity, and the emotional damage that can result whenchildren become obese and are unable to keep up with their peers or areostracized because of their weight problem. (2 4). Krisberg suggests that one easy place to start is with the foodserved in schools. This article suggests it is everyone'sresponsibility to create a healthier environment in which children can growup. Marianne Hurst writing for Education Week (2 4) suggests thatmany overweight children may have eating disorders. Momentum Builds to Confront Child Obesity. Currently, only foods sold through the federally fundedschool lunch and breakfast programs must meet nutritional standards. (2 4). He explains thatevery obese child is at significant increased risk of developing type 2diabetes. Nation's Health, 34(9): 1.Matheson, D., Killen, J., Yun, W. This may be the reasonof their abnormal weight gain. According to Douglas Willms writing in CMAJ: Canadian MedicalAssociation Journal (2 4), research on the risk factors associated withearly childhood obesity is at an early stage. Otherfood, such as food sold a la carte or in vending machines need not meet anystandards. Consumer Comments, 28(4): 2. According to Willms, it is estimated that 1 percent of school-aged children in the world, between five and 17 years old are overweight orobese and the situation is getting worse every year (Willms, 2 4, 243). No Quick Fix for Obesity. Hurst suggests aggressiveefforts are required to educate parents about the basics of a healthylifestyle and to gain parents' commitment to help their children to loseweight (Hurst, 2 4, 5). Among them are diets high in fat, sugar and caloriescombined with a sedentary lifestyle among many Americans includingchildren. Their research indicates that children watchingtelevision tend to snack on the kinds of food their parents would probablywant them to avoid. Willms agrees with Hurst that American children are now at risk anddrastic measures should be taken to address this problem. Donna Matheson, Joel Killen, and Wang Yun writing for NutritionResearch Newsletter (2 4) suggest that one change parents can make islimiting television time. According to Hurst, trying to makelifestyle changes without addressing the underlying psychological reasonthat some children compulsively overeat could actually make the problemworse for these children. It is characterized by binging, and the use of food to soothedisturbing emotions in children. Early childhood obesity: a call for early surveillance and preventive measures. Summary: According to an article in Consumer Comments (2 4),reversing the obesity epidemic will require a multifaceted approach byparents, students, teachers, schools, family members, communities, the foodindustry, the entertainment industry, and the local and state and federalgovernment. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, 171(3): 243.(2 4). Kim Krisberg writing for Nation's Health (2 4), suggest thatchildhood obesity should be considered a national public health priority.Currently, nine million children older than six are considered obese.During the past thirty years, obesity among children ages 6 to 11 in theUnited States has more than tripled. There is a significant increase in the incidence of obesity in the Americanpopulation according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Alarmingly, this problem affects more children each day. Not only do they consume high calorie food, theirstudy showed that children tend to overeat in this situation because thetelevision is somewhat hypnotic to viewers (Matheson, Killen, Yun, 2 4,5). Parents should encourage physical activity by reducing theirchildren's television and computer time, and communities should providebetter and safer recreational facilities for children ("No Quick Fix forObesity," 2 4, 4). (2 4). Krisberg suggests that school administrators implementnutritional standards for all foods sold on campus (Krisberg, 2 4, 1). (2 4). One of these eating disorders is compulsiveovereating. Education Week, 24(7): 5.Krisberg, K. ReferencesHurst, M. Children's Dietary Intake and Television Viewing. Krisberg indicates that limiting thefuture impact of childhood obesity will require a tremendous investment intreatment and prevention. Other research has implicated smoking duringpregnancy and parental obesity as risk factors. Schools can improve the nutrition of the food they serve, and mightconsider requiring at least 3 minutes of student physical activity everyday. For example, a recentlypublished study of Israeli army recruits found that youth whose birthweights were greater than 4 grams were more than three times as likelyto be obese at age 17. The great health advances made possible bygenetics and other biomedical discoveries could be offset by the burden ofillness, disability and death caused by too many people eating too much andexercising too little.

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